Comprehensive Eye Exams - Surrey, B.C.

At Abasa Optical, we provide comprehensive eye exams and eye testing for the Surrey, Langley, Cloverdale, and surrounding areas.  We have all the latest technology and testing equipment and we’d be happy to provide you a thorough eye exam.

Full Eye Exam - Vision Test

At Hillcrest Village Optometry, we use a variety of different tests and procedures to examine your eyes. Our tests range from relatively simple ones, like reading an eye chat from various distances, to more complex tests, using higher-powered machinery and tools to scan and measure the tiny structures in your eyes.

Please note up front that a comprehensive exam can take an hour or more (depending on the tests performed) so please schedule your time accordingly.  

Without any further ado, here is a look at some of the tests we perform at Hillcrest Village Optometry.

Vision Tests

This is the first test we perform as it very quickly gives us a good measure of the sharpness of your vision.  We have you stand pre-measured distanced from a projected eye chart where we ask you to read a series of increasingly difficult to read letters.  This allows us to specifically measure your visual acuity at a distance.  Also, we have you ready from a small, hand-held chart as well to measure your near vision.

Colour Blindness Test

Often the second test we perform, this test allows us to check your ability to see colours while ruling out potential colour blindness.  You will be shown a number of colour “plates” with each of them having a number or path “embedded” in each of them.  See previous image as an example.

This test is used to determine how well your eyes work together.

During this test, we will ask you to focus on an object across the room to start and then, once you are focused, we will have you cover each of your eyes in an alternating manner.  We then repeat this test while having you stare at a close range object.  The objective of these tests is to determine how well your eyes work together as well as ruling out “lazy eye” and other related eye issues.

Cover Test

This test is used to determine how well your eyes work together.

During this test, we will ask you to focus on an object across the room to start and then, once you are focused, we will have you cover each of your eyes in an alternating manner. We then repeat this test while having you stare at a close range object. The objective of these tests is to determine how well your eyes work together as well as ruling out “lazy eye” and other related eye issues.

Eye Movement Test (aka Ocular Motility Testing)

Eye Movement testing, or Ocular motility testing, is used to assess two things.  Firstly, we want to measure your ability to alternate your focus between separate (moving) targets.  Secondly, we want to assess how well you are able to follow a moving object.  During this test we will have you follow a moving object (usually a finger or a light) with your eyes.  Eye movement issues are often a significant source of eye strain and headaches.  

Depth Perception aka “Stereopsis" Test

Stereopsis is the term used to describe eye teaming that enables normal depth perception and appreciation of the 3-dimensional nature of objects.

In one commonly used stereopsis test, you wear a pair of “3D” glasses and look at a booklet of test patterns. Each pattern has four small circles, and your task is to point out which circle in each pattern looks closer to you than the other three circles. If you can correctly identify the “closer” circle in each pattern, you likely have excellent eye teaming skills that should enable you to experience normal depth perception.

Retinoscopy

In retinoscopy, we are  trying to measure the “refractive error” in your eyes.  Simply put, we are measuring the way light bounces off your eyes. 

We are going to measure your ability to focus under the circumstances we create during the eye exam.  If we notice that your focus is not 100%, we hold different prescription lenses in front of your eyes.  Our goal is to figure out which lens fixes the refractive error.

In this test, you will be in a darkened room and your optometrist will ask you to keep your eyes fixed on a particular object.  Note: There is no eye chart in test.

The Glaucoma Test

This is a very common test, and one that we use to test / measure the pressure inside your eyes.  We emit a “puff of air” (aka non-contact tonometry).  This test is the one that most people like the least, as it requires you to sit still while we puff air into your eye.  Doctor’s note:  This test is completely painless!  Based on the results of this test, we can determine if you have, or are in the process of developing, Glaucoma.

Refraction

This is the test that your eye doctor uses to determine your exact eyeglass or contact lens prescription. During a refraction eye test, the doctor puts an instrument called a phoropter in front of your eyes and shows you a series of lens choices. He or she will then ask you which of the two lenses in each choice looks clearer.

Based on your answers, your eye doctor will continue to fine-tune the lens power until reaching a final eyeglass prescription.  The refraction determines your level of hyperopia (farsightedness), myopia (nearsightedness), astigmatism and presbyopia.

Slit Lamp Exam

A slit lamp exam is an exam that allows your optometrist to detect abnormalities or problems with your eyes.  In particular, we are looking for issues like:  A detached retina, macular degeneration, injuries to the cornea, and cataracts.

A slit lamp is a binocular microscope (or “biomicroscope”) that your eye doctor uses to examine the structures of your eye under high magnification. It looks somewhat like a large, upright version of a microscope used in a science lab.

During the slit lamp exam, you will be asked to place your forehead and chin securely against the rests on the front of the instrument and your doctor will begin by examining the structures of the front of your eyes — including your eyelids, cornea, conjunctiva, iris, and lens.

With the help of a hand-held lens, your doctor may also use the slit lamp to examine structures located farther back in the eye, such as the retina and optic nerve.

Autorefractors And Aberrometers

During our comprehensive eye exam, we use an autorefractor or aberrometer to automatically estimate your eyeglass prescription. With both devices, a chin rest stabilizes your head while you look into the instrument at a pinpoint of light or a detailed image.

An autorefractor, like a manual refraction, determines the lens power required to accurately focus light on your retina. Autorefractors are especially helpful for determining an eyeglass prescription for young children and other patients who may have trouble sitting still, paying attention and providing feedback that the eye doctor needs to perform an accurate manual refraction.

Studies have shown that modern autorefractors are very accurate. They also save time. The autorefraction takes only a few seconds, and the results obtained from the automated test greatly reduce the time required for your eye doctor to perform a manual refraction and determine your eyeglass prescription.

An aberrometer uses advanced wavefront technology to detect even obscure vision errors based on the way light travels through your eye. Aberrometers primarily are used for custom or wavefront LASIK vision correction procedures, but many eye doctors are now incorporating this advanced technology into their routine eye exams as well.

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#202 18730 – Fraser Hwy, Surrey, B.C. V3S 7Y4
Phone: (604) 575 – 9141
Fax: (604) 575 – 9161

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